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'Non-stop flights to Beijing and Shanghai coming soon'

First direct fligh to Hong Kong from NW takes off

Written by . Published on December 8th 2014.


'Non-stop flights to Beijing and Shanghai coming soon'
 

THE world just got smaller today as the North West got its first ever direct non-stop link to China.

Cathay Pacific launched its four-times-a-week, non-stop flight to Hong Kong with a journey time of 12 hours.

The award-winning carrier operates flights from Hong Kong to 22 of mainland China's most important cities, making it easy to book straight through journeys, via the one time British colony.

At today's launch, Charlie Cornish, Manchester Airport's Group CEO spoke of even more links to the Far East.

You wait for one long haul jet to come along, and what happens, they come in threes.

Heathrow

Cornish said the first ever non-stop direct link between Manchester and Beijing is to be announced within two to three months, with the liklihood of non-stop flights to Shanghai waiting in the wings.

It will mean an end to those long journeys to Heathrow for decent non-stop flights, and will mean a boost for tourism and business in the North West.

Cornish told Confidential about the proposed five-times a week flight to the Chinese capital, saying talks are at an advanced stage. Although he declined to name the operator of the new service he said formal confirmation will be made "within two to three months" with the new service operational in 2015.

He said a direct flight to Shanghai from Manchester is likely to follow the Beijing link.

Cornish said it had been a long-time ambition of the airport to introduce the first direct flights to China outside of London.

"The introduction of the new link to Hong Kong is a really exciting day for Manchester, and something we have been awaiting for a long period. Hong Kong is a great gateway to mainland China."

Cornish said with 300,000 people a year travelling from North West England to China he was confident the service will grow. That figure does not include the 130,000 a year flying to Hong Kong from Manchester's catchment area/

With thousands making the journeys every year from Manchester’s catchment journey to Beijing and Shanghai, it pointed to a growing need for direct air links to those cities, boosted by growing trade links with Northern England.

Cornish chairs the North West Greater Manchester China Forum, a body tasked with encouraging more trade links between the region and China.

"Airport City is key to the development of those trade links. In the next 20 years China is going to be the most significant economic player in the world, so our close relationship with China is important.

"A number of Chinese businesses have already been attracted and more will follow, helped by good connectivity between our region and China," said Cornish.

The new four-times-a-week 12-hour flight to Hong Kong is operated by Cathay Pacific. Their European general manager Angus Barclay said early indications are the new link to Hong Kong will be a success, allowing thousands of travellers in Northern England to avoid the long journey to London for non-stop direct flights. Further flights will be added if demand justifies it, said Barclay.

What's more the new flight from Manchester to Hong Kong offers the shortest journey time to Sydney, under 22 hours. It beats Emirates journey time (currently the fastest from Manchester) by 20 minutes.

Press-Release-757Mmx380mm

Watching today’s first flight to Hong Kong was Lau Yew Cheong, Lead Director in the UK for State-owned Beijing Construction Engineering Group (BCEG).

The group has established its first UK base at Manchester Airport, close to the £800m economic and commercial enterprise zone known as Airport City. BCEG is the biggest investor in Airport City in a partnership with Manchester Airport Group (MAG), owners of the airport.

As well as providing investment over a 15-year period, BCEG’s construction arm will also be involved in building projects within Airport City.

Lau said the new direct air links will help further links and co-operation between China and Manchester.

"Airport City is our first investment in the UK and we have a very good partnership with MAG, helping and guiding us.

"We are very excited by the new link to Hong Kong as our UK office in Manchester is supported by the BCEG office in Hong Kong."

Cathay Pacific say early next year it plans to introduce a new non-stop direct link between Zurich and Hong Kong.

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59 comments so far, continue the conversation, write a comment.

Joe49December 22nd 2014.

I don't understand this. I worked in Hong Kong from 1993 to 2001 and I definitely flew Cathay Pacific HK to Manchester return at least once. I remember because Cathay upgraded me from Business Class to First on the return leg to HK. Maybe HK wasn't classed as China when it was a Crown Colony? Curious . . . . .

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousDecember 22nd 2014.

You're not on your own. I also flew to HK direct from Manchester in the late 1990's.

AnonymousDecember 23rd 2014.

The flights in the '90's had a stop on the way, either Paris or Amsterdam depending on the day. The flights now are non stop

mickeydrippin'December 23rd 2014.

I recall there were great hopes of attracting Chinese investment to Liverpool following the city's participation in the Shanghai Expo. Sadly, Manchester seems to have jumped in and snatched all the "goodies" for themselves and, as usual, have left us to search for a few crumbs from the table.

40 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousDecember 23rd 2014.

What a ridiculous line of thought, you portray their success as some sort of robbery! Maybe their representatives didn't have the same loser / victim mindset as you seem to have.

AnonymousDecember 23rd 2014.

And some people wonder where the "self-pity city" tag comes from...

mickeydrippin'December 23rd 2014.

Sorry, did not intend to give the impression that our friends along the M62 have stolen business from Liverpool. My thought is that Liverpool Waters development, and the city in general, was supposed to attract businesses from China and elsewhere. However, whilst Peel Holdings and Uncle Joe seem to have dithered, Manchester has steamed ahead and successfully negotiated a great deal of investment from China - and good luck to them!

rinkydinkDecember 23rd 2014.

Who wants to go to Liverpool to fly abroad? It's out in nowhere land next to the sea, so a small catchment area and the airport is horrendous. It'll never compete with Manchester because of its geographical location - except of course for anything involves water

rinkydinkDecember 23rd 2014.

....that involves water

John BradleyDecember 23rd 2014.

That water connects us to the rest of the world Manchester cannot match, you tried once with a big ditch but failed. Manchester is cut of from one half of the world by the Pennines. Liverpool has connections through 3/2pi radians rather than Manchester pi.

rinkydinkDecember 23rd 2014.

The water surrounds you with water. Manchester is surrounded by towns and people. Not fish

rinkydinkDecember 23rd 2014.

Even the city centre is cut in half

rinkydinkDecember 23rd 2014.

Are people going to sail into Liverpool to travel from it's tacky airport? No

AnonymousDecember 24th 2014.

Easy now Rink! Sounds like you've got a beef with the Scousers.

John BradleyDecember 24th 2014.

Manchester has to it's east the Pennines, We have 3 tunnels that go under the water, but I doubt you can comprehend that.

AnonymousDecember 24th 2014.

building that 'ditch' signalled the start of the decline of Liverpool as a major city...Manchester is officially a beta city heading for alpha status while Liverpool is a fifth rate city .... en.m.wikipedia.org/…/Global_city…

AnonymousDecember 24th 2014.

John Bradley appears to think we're still in the 1800s.

EdwardDecember 24th 2014.

Liverpool - The best slave trading port of all 18th Century Europe.

John BradleyDecember 24th 2014.

The ditch had little effect and was never a financial success, it was paid for by the rates and the people of Manchester paid for it into the 80s.

AnonymousDecember 24th 2014.

Building "the ditch" represented ambition, and forward-thinking. It's still one of the world's longest shipping canals. 125 years on, you're left making meaningless glib statements about Liverpool being 'connected to the world' because it's surrounded by water.

rinkydinkDecember 24th 2014.

Liverpool is cut off from the rest of England to a degree, never mind the world. There is just sea beyond it and it's bloody tunnels that he's bleating on about. They are not running HS2 to Liverpool. One suspects it's because it is indeed cut off!

John BradleyDecember 24th 2014.

Building the ditch was a waster of time and money. Building the Liverpool and Manchester railway was ambition and Manchester had very little to do with that. "In Liverpool 172 people took 1,979 shares, in London 96 took 844, Manchester 15 with 124, 24 others with 286"

AnonymousDecember 24th 2014.

Building the ditch stopped Manchester being ripped off my greedy Liverpool merchants....and the railway connected Liverpool to Manchester, the ninth largest city in the world in those days and one of the wealthiest...

AnonymousDecember 24th 2014.

The ship canal was an enormous success, establishing manchester as the third largest port in the uk; the establishment of a spot market in the import of raw cotton in manchester (much to the surprise and annoyance of scousers and in addition to the global export market already established here); a large scale and permanent diversification of the local economy particularly in the skilled engineering trades; and pioneered containerisation in this country, again, much to the chagrin of the comparatively backward Liverpool docks.

rinkydinkDecember 24th 2014.

Liverpudlians can't handle the fact that Manchester left it begind decades ago

rinkydinkDecember 24th 2014.

Liverpudlians can't handle the fact that Manchester left it begind decades ago

rinkydinkDecember 24th 2014.

Behind

AnonymousDecember 24th 2014.

Yawn. Is there nothing doing on Mancon, Rinkydink? I mean we have our own ranters here who post at questionable times, but even the weirdest of our trolls has better things to do than try to wind up Mancon readers on Christmas Eve. Go and play in the Irwell. Nowt doing here.

John BradleyDecember 24th 2014.

The canal was completed just as the Long Depression was coming to an end,[73] but it was never the commercial success its sponsors had hoped for. Many ship owners were reluctant to dispatch ocean-going vessels along a "locked cul-de-sac" at a maximum speed of 6 knots (11 km/h; 6.9 mph). The Ship Canal Company found it difficult to attract a diversified export trade, which meant that ships not uncommonly had to return down the canal loaded with ballast rather than freight. The only staple imports attracted to the Port of Manchester were lamp oil and bananas, the latter from 1902 until 1911. As the import trade in oil began to grow during the 20th century the balance of canal traffic switched to the west, from Salford to Stanlow, eventually culminating in the closure of the docks at Salford. Historian Thomas Stuart Willan has observed that "What may seem to require explanation is not the comparative failure of the Ship Canal but the unquenchable vitality of the myth of its success".[74] en.wikipedia.org/…/Manchester_Ship_Canal…

AnonymousDecember 25th 2014.

It was an undoubted success both in terms of the cost of exporting goods (which was as economic to send via Hull than it was via Liverpool before the advent of the canal ) but especially in the wider economic impact it had on the city. Trade may not have taken off quickly in the early years but rather than whinge about it blame others (as is the way of inhabitants of certain other cities), the enterprising men of manchester set about creating Trafford Park and Manchester Liners: "The Manchester Ship Canal enabled the newly created Port of Manchester to become Britain's third-busiest port, despite the city being about 40 miles (64 km) inland.[51] Since its opening in 1894 the canal has handled a wide range of ships and cargos, from coastal vessels to intra-European shipping and inter-continental cargo liners" en.m.wikipedia.org/…/Manchester_Ship_Canal…

John BradleyDecember 25th 2014.

So that is you on one side and historians on the other. 3rd biggest port a long long long long long way behind Liverpool and London. The business of Manchester moaned about port charges and so got the poor rate payers of Manc to spend a fortune they never got back.

AnonymousDecember 25th 2014.

That is not my opinion but the broad consensus from a range of credible sources. You should read more books John rather than copy pasting isolated excerpts from Wikipedia.

John BradleyDecember 25th 2014.

It is you opinion, the Wikipedia quiet is itself referenced, which is more than can be said for yours. You have to listen to some non Mancs.

AnonymousDecember 25th 2014.

www.thecalmzone.net/…/…

AnonymousDecember 25th 2014.

Ah the 'Wikipedia quiet' - the desperate refuge for secondary school slackers. Must try harder. See me after class John.

John BradleyDecember 26th 2014.

Still not produced and references for you opinion books or other wise. The usual sign of me mate said references.

AnonymousDecember 26th 2014.

It might have escaped your notice but internet forums and comments pages are not academic journals. I don't have anything to prove and I couldn't give a hoot about your opinion. You have every right to enjoy Wikipedia however and I am impressed that you are well versed with the CTRL + V function on your keyboard. :) and btw, are you drunk?!

John BradleyDecember 26th 2014.

I must assume you don't know what a reference but the Wikipedia articles reference is "Willan, Thomas Stuart (1977), Chaloner, W. H.; Ratcliffe, Barrie M., eds., Trade and Transport: Essays in Economic History in Honour of T. S. Willan, Manchester University Press, ISBN 0-8476-6013-3" Which is not a journalists but an academic paper, it is generally a failing of those criticising Wikipedia that they don't,know how to check references. This is one of the Obits of the author www.independent.co.uk/…/obituary-professor-t-s-willan-1424285.html… which puts the comments as considerably more reliable than you mates opinion.

AnonymousDecember 26th 2014.

I know what a reference is and I know what a charlatan is, that is to say someone who might attempt to create an entire narrative based upon a few words ripped from Wiki - referenced or otherwise. I therefore laugh in the face of your feeble attempt to give your assertions greater credibility.

rinkydinkDecember 26th 2014.

Right ok then John. The Manchester Ship Canal might have been a failure. Who cares? This is typical of Liverpudlians. Living in the past while Manchester changes and moves on every day and it's beyond Liverpool's reach now. Eat it

AnonymousDecember 26th 2014.

Spending Christmas afternoon, and then in the middle of the night arguing some ludicrous and irrelevant point about the Manchester Ship Canal. You need help John.

AnonymousDecember 26th 2014.

But it wasn't a failure Rinkydink. That's the whole point.

AnonymousDecember 26th 2014.

Too true, pitiful isn't it. We tried to help www.thecalmzone.net/…/…

John BradleyDecember 26th 2014.

Well it takes 2 to argue.

John BradleyDecember 23rd 2014.

Manchester has to it's east the Pennines, We have 3 tunnels that go under the water, but I doubt you can comprehend that.

8 Responses: Reply To This...
rinkydinkDecember 24th 2014.

Am I talking to a brick wall here? So beyond the Pennines there are people. Some of those people use Manchester airport. Beyond the seafront there is fucking water and no people!

rinkydinkDecember 24th 2014.

And yes Liverpool has a great potential connection to the rest of the world by boat. But we're talking about flying

John BradleyDecember 24th 2014.

and beyond the water are people. Beyond the Pennines is Leeds, which provides all the connections that people needs.

rinkydinkDecember 24th 2014.

Leeds doesn't fly to fucking China! Give me strength!

mickeydrippin'December 24th 2014.

Language Rinky!!!

John BradleyDecember 24th 2014.

No but people from Leeds would rather get a fast train down South than crawl across the Pennines then be shunted around Manc before a flight.

rinkydinkDecember 24th 2014.

Well better that than being taken to the end of the earth and flying from the dump that is Liverpool

John BradleyDecember 25th 2014.

Which is what the inhabitants of Leeds say about Manc.

Ramsey CampbellDecember 26th 2014.

I don't mind admitting that being able to park in a multi-storey with direct access to the terminal sells Manchester to me over Liverpool.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
V. I. Lenin AitportJanuary 29th 2015.

Whereas, Mr. Campbell, you get the feeling that you are being robbed by Peel Holdings before you've even managed to park at Speke. Also motoring Wirral dwellers - via M53, M56 etc. - can get to Manchester Airport as quickly and with a lot less fuss than faffing about with tunnels, congestion, traffic lights and the 30mph "Aigburth Corridor" that obstruct the way to Liverpool airport.

V. I. Lenin AitportJanuary 29th 2015.

This would also apply to travellers coming from North Wales. In fact if you live in central Liverpool this might also apply.

mickeydrippin'December 26th 2014.

My original post seems to have started a really heated Liverpool v Manchester argument over the Xmas holiday. So let's all calm down and hope that both cities prosper in 2015. Happy New Year everyone.

AnonymousDecember 27th 2014.

Liverpool is Yet Another Fucking Italian YAFI while Manchester is Salvis

1 Response: Reply To This...
mickeydrippin'January 5th 2015.

Explain please???

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