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Dale Street's rotting row sold for £1

Developer Jamworks gets it on the cheap side

Written by . Published on November 28th 2013.


Dale Street's rotting row sold for £1
 

IT'S one of Liverpool’s most famous streets, celebrated as the thoroughfare where free men of the city can walk their flocks of sheep . It is home to the headquarters of the city council and now a row of buildings is on offer for just £1. 

Bringing "pound land" (not the shop) to Dale Street is part of a plan by Mayor Anderson to restore some of the oldest commercial buildings in the heart of Liverpool. 

Local developer Jamworks will be offered vacant 87-95 Dale Street and 2-6 Cheapside, as part of a deal to restore the vacant buildings, dating back to 1819.

The company is about to start work on a £5m conversion of the old Bridewell – the one time city jail – into student flats. 

Mayor Anderson’s cabinet will be asked, on Friday 6 December, to approve the scheme to save what is a row of Grade II listed buildings.  

Under the proposals, the council will hand over the 200-year-old, council-owned buildings opposite the Municipal Buildings  to Jamworks for £1 on completion of all of the works, unlocking an investment of over £2m. 

The so-called Dale Street Shops are in a poor – and deteriorating – condition, and the deal would secure the future of the buildings, protecting their architectural heritage while delivering 330sq m of new retail and commercial space and 12 residential units. 

If the Dale Street Shops scheme is given the go-ahead, Jamworks will do both projects in tandem. 

Mayor Anderson, said: “Dale Street Shops are an important historical landmark for the city, but they have steadily deteriorated over the past decade, becoming a real eyesore. It has been a major problem which has been difficult for us to resolve, despite the best efforts of our officers. 

“Taking such an innovative approach in this case gives us an excellent opportunity to finally bring these buildings back into sustainable use.

These proposals represent a sound financial deal for the public purse.” 

Dale Street Shops VisualSort of how it will look

Dale Streets Shops have a ‘conservation deficit’ or funding gap of approximately £650,000 due to the costly restoration works required, on top of the basic development costs. As part of the deal, the city council would make a grant of £275,000 available to the developer from its Buildings at Risk Capital programme to make the project financially viable. 

Jamworks Ltd has a solid track record of dealing with heritage buildings, with other successful projects including the restoration of the listed building at 71 Shaw Street in Everton. 

Mark Connor, chief executive from project managers Vermont Capitol Ltd, said: “Our plans for the Bridewell building are moving forward quickly, and we believe that by combining this work with the restoration of Dale Street shops, we could create something really special.” 

The city says robust background and financial checks will be undertaken, alongside full due diligence on the detail of the proposal. 

A planning application will be submitted shortly and if given the go-ahead, work is expected to start next Spring and be complete within 12 months. 

*Further reading here

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16 comments so far, continue the conversation, write a comment.

AnonymousNovember 29th 2013.

'Mayor Anderson, said: “Dale Street Shops are an important historical landmark for the city, but they have steadily deteriorated over the past decade, becoming a real eyesore. It has been a major problem which has been difficult for us to resolve, despite the best efforts of our officers.' Here's nothing difficult about it; identify those responsible and make them financially liable for the mess they've made of public property. They'll have big houses and fancy cars that can be sold, fat pensions and bank deposits.

AnonymousNovember 29th 2013.

There's only so much spending power in a city and the masses have been shepherded towards Liverpool One. It's not just Dale Street, London road is the same. We should have regenerated instead of building even more shops. The high street is dying anyway thanks to major internet Tax dodgers like Amazon and others. The best thing to do with the shops on Dale Street would be to convert them for residential use

3 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousNovember 30th 2013.

The high street is dying because the landlords charge astronomical rents. Now that particular cash cow has been milked dry and the premises all stand empty the property companies want their Tory chums in government to bully local authorities into giving out planning permissions to turn shops into yet more flats for quick sale.

Dave ParryNovember 30th 2013.

Your're rubbish you big derek.

AnonymousNovember 30th 2013.

I'd sooner building be used for something instead of going to rot. I agree that the high rates and rents have helped to kill the high street, and I don't like the rich getting richer either. The best thing to do with them would be to convert them to social housing that we're so desperately in need of. The reality is, someone will make a fast buck at the expense of council tax payers

AnonymousNovember 30th 2013.

What's the difference between being shepherded and actually wanting to go somewhere? Think you've missed some important points

4 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousNovember 30th 2013.

The difference is choice. The main Post Office in the city centre is in Liverpool One. John Lewis, Debenhams, HMV etc are all in Liverpool One. If all these business were on London Road for example, people would have to go there. In other words people have to go to Liverpool One whether they like it or not

AnonymousNovember 30th 2013.

So big name stores would actually want to relocate to London Road? What do you want, state control of where shops can set up? get real mate, you're in fantasy land! People who go there do because they love it, people like you want to wear a hair shirt and begrudge anything that's successful and new.

AnonymousDecember 1st 2013.

If all the main shops were on London Road and nowhere else you'd Have to shop there whether you liked it or not. I don't want state control over shops. I don't really care one way or the other about Liverpool One, but if people spend all their money there other areas are bound to suffer it's simple economics. Love the hair shirt imagery by the way, have you any chance been reading the DaVinci code?

AnonymousDecember 1st 2013.

ANONYMOUSYesterday evening at 6:34 PM. So big name stores would actually want to relocate to London Road? What do you want, state control of where shops can set up? get real mate, you're in fantasy land! People who go there do because they love it, people like you want to wear a hair shirt and begrudge anything that's successful and new. Is that you John Bradley?

fairy NuffNovember 30th 2013.

Sound economic sense, we give some "Jammy Bugger" £275 grand. Then charge them a quid, making a total of £21 from property sales this year. They build student accommodation, charge them excessive rents, literally coining it. The students are exempt from council tax., so there is no return for the council. I suggest someone does a robust check on the council.

fairy NuffNovember 30th 2013.

"These proposals represent a sound financial deal for the public purse". Was this statement on the council handout or was it a conclusion you arrived at yourself?

AnonymousDecember 1st 2013.

London Road went into decline once the population of North Liverpool (mainly Scottie Road) were put out to grass in Kirkby etc. When the city had a population of over 900,000 (and that was only half a century ago) Liverpool sustained two city centres, one for the north enders ie London Road and one for everyone else. The London Road went downhill for economic reasons. If you think Liverpool ONE looks busy, have a look ath the early pho;tos of Liverpool in the first half of the 1900s, the whole place was buzzing.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousDecember 1st 2013.

When I was a lad we lived on Smithdown Road and lots of us went to London Road mainly for T.J. Hughes. I think it was cheaper to catch the 46 bus to London Road than it was to get the 86 to Renshaw/Ranelagh/Church/Lord Streets. Also we had a third city centre that was Wavertree Road which even had a department store Freemans.

fairy NuffDecember 1st 2013.

It's true that London road shops went in to decline, it is also true that many of the inner city population were moved elsewhere. However the assertion that it was the sole province of "northenders" is incorrect. Shopping underwent a major sea change. ie. small shops in Byrom St , Kensington, Park Road, ceased to trade, this coincided with the advent of superstores, changes in public transport, all factors that contributed to London Road not being as vibrant as it once was

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